The Eighties Club
The Politics and Pop Culture of the 1980s
Featured Song/Artist
"If You Leave"
Orchestral Manouevres in the Dark
Written by OMD, from the Pretty in Pink soundtrack (1986)


If you leave, don't leave now
Please don't take my heart away
Promise me just one more night
Then we'll go our separate ways
We've always had time on our sides
But now it's fading fast
Every second, every moment
We've got to, we've got to make it last

I touch you once, I touch you twice
I won't let go at any price
I need you now like I needed you then
You always said we'd still be friends someday

If you leave, I won't cry
I won't waste one single day
But if you leave, don't look back
I'll be running the other way
Seven years went under the bridge
Like time was standing still
Heaven knows what happens now
You've got to, you've gotta say you will

I touch you once, I touch you twice
I won't let go at any price
I need you now like I needed you then
You always said we'd meet again
I touch you once, I touch you twice
I won't let go at any price
I need you now like I needed you then
You always said we'd still be friends
I touch you once, I touch you twice
I won't let go at any price
I need you now like I needed you then
You always said we'd meet again someday

Andy McCluskey (b. 24 June 1959, Wirral, Cheshire) and John Humphreys (b.27 February 1960, London) were schoolyard friends who played together, and separately, in a number of local Liverpool bands. Inspired by the electronic pop of bands like Kraftwerk, they formed VCL XI in 1978. Renamed Orchestral Manouevres in the Dark, the band's first single, "Electricity," was released by a Manchester-based independent label, and its success led to a signing with Din Disc, a Virgin subsidiary. In 1980 their debut album, Orchestral Manouevres in the Dark, reached UK#27 thanks to the strength of synth-pop hits like "Messages" (UK#13) and "Enola Gay (UK#8). Their second album, Organisation, was released later that same year and was followed by an extensive 1981 tour through Europe and America. McCluskey (vocals) and Humphreys (synthesizers) were joined by old friends Martin Cooper (keyboards) and Malcolm Holmes (drums), a line-up that remained intact for most of the decade. OMD continued to meet with critical and commercial success in the UK with subsequent albums, Architecture And Morality (1981), Dazzle Ships (1983) and Junk Culture (1984), all of which reached the Top Ten on the UK album charts, but the band failed to have an impact in the United States until the mid-Eighties with "If You Leave," a song featured on the soundtrack for the hit film Pretty in Pink. "If You Leave" peaked at US#4, OMD's best chart performance in America. (It did not do well in Britain, though, stalling at UK#48.) Virtually non-stop touring took its toll on the band members, and in 1989 Humphreys, Cooper and Holmes quit. McCluskey recruited new band members and forged on into the Nineties, producing several more successful albums. OMD was recognized as leaders in synth pop, able to blend innovative technique with lyrical melodies that appealed to the mainstream

As VCL XI, McCluskey and Humphreys debuted at the Liverpool disco, Eric's, a club influential in the careers of many other musicians, among them members of Echo and the Bunnymen and Frankie Goes To Hollywood.

After leaving OMD, Humphreys joined forces with drummer Holmes and keyboardist Cooper to form a new band, Listening Pool, releasing an album entitled Still Life on their own Telegraph label.

In 1984, Humphreys quit the band in order to spend more time with his American wife -- only to change his mind ten days later.


"Don't Worry, Be Happy" 
Bobby McFerrin
Writtenby Bobby McFerrin
Simple Pleasures (EMI Manhattan, 1988)


Here's a little song I wrote
You might want to sing it note for note
Don't worry, be happy
In every life we have some trouble
But when you worry you make it double
Don't worry, be happy
Don't worry, be happy now
Don't worry, be happy
Don't worry, be happy

Ain't got no place to lay your head
Somebody came and took your bed
Don't worry, be happy
The landlord say your rent is late
He may have to litigate
Don't worry, be happy
Look at me -- I'm happy
Don't worry, be happy
Here I give you my phone number
When you worry call me, I make you happy
Don't worry, be happy

Ain't got no cash, ain't got no style
Ain't got no gal to make you smile
Don't worry, be happy
'Cause when you worry your face will frown
And that will bring everybody down
Don't worry, be happy
Don't worry, don't worry, don't do it
Be happy, put a smile on your face
Don't bring everybody down
Don't worry, it will soon pass, whatever it is
Don't worry, be happy
I'm not worried, I'm happy...


Bobby McFerrin (b. 11 March 1950, New York City) was raised in a musical family. Both his parents were opera singers; his father was one of the first black performers in the Metropolitan Opera and sang on the 1959 soundtrack to Porgy and Bess. When the family moved to Los Angeles, Bobby's mother Ruth taught in the voice department at Fullerton College. At age six Bobby began to study music theory and was trained as a pianist at Julliard. While still in high school he joined the Bobby Mack Jazz Quintet. Later he seriously considered becoming an Episcopalian minister, but Bill Cosby heard him play in the Salt Lake City Hilton piano bar and got him a solo spot at the 1980 Playboy Jazz Festival. His appearance as an unaccompanied vocalist in 1981's Kool Jazz Festival won him rave reviews. With his first three albums -- Bobby McFerrin (1982), The Voice (1984) and Spontaneous Inventions (1986), McFerrin perfected his unique vocal improvisations; on a cover of Cream's "Sunshine Of Your Love" he improvised a vocal "electric guitar." 1988's Simple Pleasures was envisioned as a collection of remakes of Sixties songs, but McFerrin's own composition, "Don't Worry, Be Happy," was included -- and spent two weeks at the top of Billboard's Hot 100 in September 1988, having been included on the soundtrack to the Tom Cruise film Cocktail. Before long it seemed as though everyone in America was singing the catchy, reggae tune. "There was some floods going on  in Texas," said Chris Montan, senior vice-president of music for Touchstone/Disney, "and I was watching the news one night, and people were floating on the tops of the roofs of their houses holding up big placards, 'Don't Worry, Be Happy.' When it gets into the vernacular of this society, you know you've got a big hit."

Music critics in Germany called McFerrin "Stimmwunder" -- Wonder Voice -- because of his amazing vocal virtuosity. According to Newsweek, there was "something about the range and technique of jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin; he sounds, by turns, like a blackbird, a Martian, an operatic soprano, a small child and a be-bop trumpet."

Bill Cosby was so impressed by McFerrin's vocal style that he insisted the singer perform the theme to his TV sitcom, The Cosby Show.

"Don't Worry, Be Happy" was the first a cappella song to reach the #1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

A diehard Democrat, McFerrin was horrified to learn that Republican presidential candidate George Bush was using "Don't Worry, Be Happy" as a campaign song in his 1988 bid for the White House.


 "All This Time"
Tiffany
Written by Tim James & Steve McClintock
Hold An Old Friend's Hand (MCA, 1988)


All this time
I knew someday you'd need to find
Something that you left behind
Something I can't give you
All these tears
And like a light love disappears
But hearts are good for souvenirs
And memories are forever

All this time
All in all I've no regrets
The sun still shines the sun still sets
The heart forgives the heart forgets
But what will I do now with all this time

One more kiss
Even though it's come to this
I'll close my eyes and make a wish
Hoping you remember

All this time
All in all I've no regrets
The sun still shines the sun still sets
The heart forgives the heart forgets
But what will I do now with all this time

Say goodbye
Apart we'll make another try
But don't be sorry if you cry
I'll be crying too

All this time
All in all I've no regrets
The sun still shines the sun still sets
The heart forgives the heart forgets
But what will I do now with all this time

Tiffany Renee Darwish (b. 10.2.71) announced to her mother at age five that she was going to be a singer. Her first public performance  was with the Country Hoedowners at a picnic in her hometown of Norwalk, California when she was nine years old. She appeared with country bands in the Los Angeles area for a few years, but it was a pop song demo that she was recording in a San Fernando Valley studio when producer George Tobin heard her sing. "In under ten minutes I decided to sign her," said Tobin. In 1986, Tobin executed an exclusive, seven-album management and production contract with Tiffany and cut 48 sides for her debut album. Thanks in no small measure to Tobin's persistence, MCA finally signed a $150,000 deal with Tiffany. An innovative promotional gimmick followed -- Tiffany sang to pre-recorded music at shopping malls in 14 cities. While MCA wasn't sure how to promote their new artist (and didn't think the album had a viable single), a programmer for a Salt Lake City radio station, Lou Simon, heard the album and was convinced Tiffany's remake of Tommy James & the Shondells'  "I Think We're Alone Now" was a hit. KCPX played the song, and was inundated with phone calls. Simon convinced MCA to release the tune as a single, and it went to the top of the Top 100 chart in November 1987, unseating Michael Jackson's "Bad." By  January 1988, the album Tiffany was #1 in the US, and as the second single, "Could've Been" became Tiffany's second chart-topper in America, "I Think We're Alone" spent three weeks at the top of the UK singles chart. Eventually, Tiffany would sell five million copies. Her second album, Hold An Old Friend's Hand, also went platinum, producing a Top Ten hit "All This Time" (US#6). Tobin's Svengali-like domination of Tiffany's career led to clashes between the singer's manager and mother, and Rolling Stone magazine questioned Tobin's strict control over album material. Tiffany toured extensively in America, Europe and Japan, and for a couple of years was a genuine teen sensation. In 1990, however, her third album, New Inside, failed to generate much interest.

Tiffany was the first artist born in the 1970s to have a Billboard #1 song, and the youngest female singer to have two consecutive Number Ones ("I Think We're Alone Now" and "Could've Been") since Brenda Lee in 1960.

"I Think We're Alone Now" was the first Number One song recorded by a teenager since 13-year-old Stevie Wonder topped the chart with "Fingertips (Pt. II)" in 1963.

In 1989, a Los Angeles judge ordered obsessed Tiffany fan Jeff Deane Turner to stay at least 200 yards away from the artist.

The phenomenal success enjoyed by Tiffany and 17-year-old Debbie Gibson ("Only In My Dreams") in 1987 convinced record companies that there was a lucrative teen-pop market, and opened the door for other young artists such as New Kids on the Block.

While touring, Tiffany kept up with her studies with the help of a tutor, Craig Yamek, who doubled as her drummer.